A female Anna’s hummingbird sits on top of her young. The nest appears to be built upon an older nest. Photo by Spenser Smith.

It’s spring, and bird nests are popping up everywhere in Nanaimo. Some, however, are harder to spot than others. A mere one inch tall, Anna’s hummingbird nests are well-camouflaged, made of leaves, moss, cattail, and other plant materials. The female takes about a week to build it and uses spider webs to bind it together. Amazingly, the eggs are only 1.2-1.4 cm long.

A female Anna’s hummingbird sits on top of her young. The nest appears to be built upon an older nest. Photo by Spenser Smith.

 

Feeding by regurgitation. Photo by Matt Mountstephen.

 

A male Anna’s hummingbird hangs out on a branch full of buds. Photo by Spenser Smith.

Want to see more bird photos? Visit Birds and Bark.

Editor

Associate Editor   Spenser is a journalist, poet, and wildlife photographer. His work has appeared in Maclean's, The Malahat Review, The Puritan, and Prairie Fire.

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